Driving down energy consumption

19 March 2019

With a wave of climate related protests sweeping Belgium and several other European countries, it is clear that climate change has taken hold of the public’s attention. At LCL we are well aware of our position in this problem. Data centers consume a lot of energy. The ICT-sector is responsible for 2 percent of worldwide CO2-emissions, according to the United Nations. With the advent of further digitalisation and cloud computing, that figure is set to climb even higher in the future.

This gives us a responsibility to act on and save energy wherever we can.

Fortunately, at LCL, we have the right men and women for the job. Over the last few months we have been optimizing our cooling regulation and equipment to decrease our energy consumption without any impact on our customers. This has allowed us to cut energy consumption in the testing part of our data center by no less than 65 percent. Needless to say this makes a huge impact on the effect our data centers have on the environment.

How did we achieve this? Until now we have had a certain way to keep the temperature low in our data centers. As our customers’ equipment creates a lot of heat and is sensitive to high temperatures, this is crucial to our operations. As is common practice in data centers, our server rooms have a ‘cold corridor’.  At LCL, these corridors have been around for year. Where we have been innovating during the past 6 months, is in temperature management. Our engineers have been experimenting with our temperature settings.

In the past we would maintain a constant temperature inside our server rooms themselves, extracting the air as it heats up and injecting cooler air. However, maintaining a constant temperature inside the cold corridor turns out to be a more efficient way of cooling, thus saving a lot of energy. The servers pull up the air from underneath the raised floor, into the cold corridor. The temperature is allowed to rise inside the room, without any effect on our equipment inside the cold corridor. This way there is less cooling to be done, hence less energy that needs to be used.

Another breakthrough was realised by modifying the speed of the fans of the cooling system outside our building. Before these would be either off or running at full speed, with no setting in between. By making the speed of the fans variable, these do not have to work at full capacity all the time, thus saving extra energy.

By using these techniques we are implementing a key part of the ‘European Code of Conduct for Energy Efficiency in Data Centers’. We are the first endorser of this code in Belgium and believe very strongly in its goals. Implementing this new cooling solution has been a challenge, especially in a live environment. Realising this project gives a great deal of satisfaction. We will now work towards expanding our test area and implementing this solution in all of our data centers.

Data centers and the ICT-sector in general inherently use a lot of power. They are also indispensable to our modern world and economy. All that does not mean that we must not strive to cut that power consumption as much as possible. At LCL, we are showing that we are more than ready to take on that responsibility